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Research Article| Volume 59, ISSUE 6, P642-646, June 1985

Abscess formation induced in rabbits with bacteria-filled subcutaneous implants that simulate the infected dental root canal

  • W.R. Moorer
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests to: Dr. W.R. Moorer Tandheelkunde Louwesweg 1 1066 EA Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Affiliations
    Department of Cariology, Endodontology and Pedodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Amsterdam Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • S.K.Thoden van Velzen
    Affiliations
    Department of Cariology, Endodontology and Pedodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Amsterdam Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • P.R. Wesselink
    Affiliations
    Department of Cariology, Endodontology and Pedodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Amsterdam Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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      Abstract

      Short-term and semi-long-term tissue reactions to a mixture of “endodontopathic” bacteria are described. The bacteria are enclosed in experimental implant tubes simulating some aspects of the infected dental pulp. Localized abscesses develop in response to mixed bacterial contents of the implants. No abscess formation occurred with pure cultures (that is, either component of the mixture). Pathogenic inocula attract leukocytes to the adjacent tissues, which become inflamed and cause influx of leukocytes into the lumen of the implant proper.
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