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Management of contaminated bone grafts

An experimental in vitro study
  • Author Footnotes
    a Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The University of Michigan; currently in private practice in Detroit.
    William Hooe
    Footnotes
    a Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The University of Michigan; currently in private practice in Detroit.
    Affiliations
    Detroit, Mich., USA

    The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    b Pediatric Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The University of Michigan.
    Barry Steinberg
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Barry Steinberg, PhD, DDS, MD Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery The University of Michigan 1500 East Medical Center Drive Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0018
    Footnotes
    b Pediatric Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The University of Michigan.
    Affiliations
    Detroit, Mich., USA

    The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    a Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The University of Michigan; currently in private practice in Detroit.
    b Pediatric Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The University of Michigan.
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      Abstract

      Objectives

      This study tested various protocols for bone decontamination after bacterial contact to determine if these treatments altered bone structure.

      Study design

      Femurs from five Sprague-Dawley rats were sectioned and separated into eight groups. These were contaminated in a broth containing Pseudomonas aeroginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Subsequently, the groups were treated with eight different decontamination regimens. A Scheffe's Grouping test was used to statistically compare the bacterial counts after each treatment protocol.

      Results

      Treatment with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and 4% alcohol, Neosporin, cefazolin, and saline solution had little effect on bacterial growth. However, povidone-iodine, autoclaving, and ethyl alcohol with ethanol did significantly decrease the bacterial colony counts from the bone specimens. The autoclave and ethyl alcohol/ethanol induced changes in bony histologic examination.

      Conclusions

      Results suggested that povidone-iodine decontaminates bone specimens without altering histologic conditions. Determination of successful grafting of bone treated with this protocol is required before its recommendation for clinical use.
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